M&D & SDGs

Case studies

Armenia

Introduction

The government of Armenia started a process to nationalize the migration-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) through IOM’s project “Monitoring Progress in Achieving Migration Targets of 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”. During this project, migration and development issues in Armenia were examined in the context of the SDGs and relevant targets were prioritized. Following this, a set of proxy indicators were developed to measure progress against these targets. Finally, a migration data mapping exercise was undertaken and steps were taken to improve national migration data collection and usage.

 

Methodology

  1. SDG prioritization: Prioritizing SDG migration targets according to national objectives.
  2. Migration data mapping: Mapping migration data to SDG monitoring needs and conducting a gap analysis.
  3. Indicator development: Developing proxy indicators to measure progress towards prioritized targets.
  4. Indicator monitoring and evaluation: Setting up appropriate data systems and processes to operationalize the indicators, to ensure necessary migration data is captured and reporting of the indicators can begin.

The project was led by the Armenian Statistical Service of the Republic of Armenia (ArmStat), given its strong focus on migration data and its overall objectives to develop and monitor SDG indicators on migration. The exercise overall included wide consultation of migration stakeholders, including civil society, the private sector, academia and the public, and engaged almost 100 people through direct consultation and/or workshops in the first two stages.

 

Prioritization

Photo credit: IOM Armenia 2016 (Photo: Matevosyan)A workshop was held in November 2016 to discuss which SDG targets should be prioritized. This was done through discussions with participants from government, civil society, academia and more. Stakeholders critically examined SDG targets in relation to migration and development issues in Armenia. Five targets were chosen as the most relevant. Following this, a validation workshop was held to discuss the targets further. During discussions, sub-themes under some of the targets were identified that were particular priorities for Armenia. For example, labour migration and return migration were identified as important components for Armenia under target 10.7.

Photo credit: IOM Armenia 2016 (Photo: Matevosyan)

Following both workshops, the prioritized targets were adapted to make them more relevant to an Armenian context. Below is a list of the prioritized targets and their adapted formulations (pending final government approval as of July 2018).

 

 

 

Migration and Education

Target 4.B. By 2020, substantially expand globally the number of scholarships available to developing countries in particular least developed countries, small island developing States and African countries, for enrolment in higher education, including vocational training and information and communications technology, technical, engineering and scientific programmes, in developed countries and other developing countries.

Proposed national target: By 2020, substantially expand the number of scholarships available to Armenian citizens for enrolment in higher education, including vocational training and information and communications technology, technical, engineering and scientific programmes, in developed countries and other developing countries, and work towards linking migrants' education to labour markets.

 

Labour Migration

Target 8.8. Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment.

Proposed national target: Protect labour rights and promote safe and secure working environments for all workers, focusing on migrant workers abroad, in particular women migrants, and those in precarious employment.

 

Migration Governance

Target 10.7. Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies.

Proposed national target: Facilitate orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through the implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies and laws, focusing on strengthening management of labour outmigration, return migration, and national asylum processes, as well as improving capacity to strengthen national migration governance in the future

 

Diaspora Engagement

Target 17.16. Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals in all countries, in particular developing countries.

Proposed national target. Enhance the global partnership for sustainable development, complemented by multi-stakeholder partnerships that mobilize and share knowledge, expertise, technology and financial resources, to support the achievement of the sustainable development goals, focusing on engaging the diaspora to support national development through knowledge and skills transfer, remittances and financial investment.

 

Migration Data

Target 17.18. By 2020, enhance capacity-building support to developing countries, including for least developed countries and small island developing States, to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and reliable data, disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts.

Proposed national target. Enhance capacity-building support to increase significantly the availability of high-quality, timely and reliable data, disaggregated by income, gender, age, race, ethnicity, migratory status, disability, geographic location and other characteristics relevant in national contexts, and improve data systems and processes to support proactive, sensitive and intelligent policy across topics in national migration management.

 

Migration Data Mapping

In parallel, a migration data mapping exercise took place. This reviewed national migration data sources, including statistical and administrative data sources, to evaluate data availability across migration topics. The mapping exercise examined migration data capturing, storing, processing, sharing, dissemination and publishing. To do this, 19 interviews were conducted across government agencies and other organizations. The ministries of Education and Science, Labour and Social Affairs, Diaspora, Healthcare, Foreign Affairs, Economic Development and Investments, the State Employment Agency and State Migration Service were interviewed, as well as the Central Bank of Armenia, three departments of the police service and various international organizations.

Photo credit: IOM Armenia 2016 (Photo: Matevosyan)The mapping exercise revealed that while much valuable migration data was collected by different bodies in Armenia, national migration statistics could be made more robust and there was incomplete data captured on a number of specific topics. For example, there was a need for more reliable statistics on emigration and immigration in different labour market sectors, as well as increased data capture on other topics, including for example return and reintegration, diaspora engagement, remittance utilization and migrant rights. The mapping exercise identified a series of specific migration data challenges and corresponding actionable recommendations. For example, to derive the greatest possible benefit from the human capital of the Armenian diaspora, there is a need to improve data collection regarding the education, skills and knowledge of Armenians abroad. One recommendation was to extend existing data collection on Armenians studying through government programs abroad to include information on their professional activities after graduation. Several of the recommendations were adopted, including some on changes to be made to the national Integrated Living Conditions Survey (ILCS). In this way, the data mapping helped identify where migration data was lacking, and helped strengthen the capacity of ArmStat on migration data.

 

Developing Indicators

Proxy national indicators were developed for the five prioritized targets. These targets were developed based on existing Armenian migration data capacities and required no additional resources or data capture. Some indicators include selected data from non-government actors. Overall these include a mix of input and outcome indicators, and of existing international indicators and some newly developed national methodologies.

 

Metadata for Selected Proxy Indicator in Armenia

Indicator

% of returned migrants who undertook paid work during the last 7 days.

Definitions

Participating in paid work as defined by specification in the ILCS as below.

Goal and target addressed

10.7, also 8.8

Unit of measurement

% of total returned migrants

Relevant international standards (if any)

-

Data source(s)

Integrated Living Conditions Survey (ILCS)

Methodology

ArmStat will take a count of those who respond to the question in Section B: ‘Since January 1, 20xx, has [NAME] migrated to another Marz or another country within 3 and more months?’ with

  • ‘2. Yes, migrated and returned after absence less than 3 months’; and
  • ‘3. Yes, migrated and returned after 3-12 months absence’.

 

Of those who responded ‘Yes” to 2 or 3 above, ArmStat will collate their answer to the question in Section D: ‘Did you have any paid work or profitable job (own business) during the last 7 days, even if you worked only for one hour (include the work in a farm, family enterprise)?’

 

ArmStat will report the % of those who responded ‘Yes’ to the above question in Section D as a percentage of those who are returned migrants as per the question in Section B.

 

In addition to this, ArmStat will detail the following disaggregation points during reporting.

Periodicity of measurement

Annual

Disaggregation

For all, disaggregate by:

  • Gender
  • Which Marz or country they returned from
  • Reason for return

 

For those who respond ‘Yes’ to the Section D question, disaggregate by answers to:

  • ‘The main type of economic activity in your workplace or business’
  • ‘What is your employment status?’
  • ‘At your work/ activity you work: 1. Full time 2. Part time 3. Overtime’

 

For those who respond ‘No’ to the Section D question, disaggregate by answers to:

  • ‘Please record the reason why you didn’t work during the last 7 days.’

 

Data points for all of the above are included in the ILCS.

Lead actor involved /other actor

ArmStat

Comments

Given that all of the above disaggregation points are already collected by the ILCS, this indicator is an opportunity to go beyond the percentage figure, allowing stakeholders to learn more about employment issues facing returned migrants.

 

Note that this will include those returning from both internal and international migration.

 

For reference: ILCS Questionnaire 2015, available from www.armstat.am/file/doc/99501303.pdf.

 

Selected Proxy Indicators

SDG Target

Selected indicators developed

4.B

Number of scholarships awarded to Armenian nationals for enrolment in higher education abroad, including vocational training and information and communications technology, technical, engineering and scientific programmes, including for exchange.

 

Data sources: Records from RA Ministry of Education and Science (MoES), Armenian General Benevolent Union (AGBU)

10.7

% of returned migrants who undertook paid work during the last 7 days.

 

Data sources: Armenian Integrated Living Conditions Survey (ILCS)

 

Proportion of individual asylum applications granted.

 

Data sources: State Migration Service (SMS) asylum seekers registration electronic database.

17.16

Number of development initiatives where Armenian nationals abroad are included as active partners.

 

Data sources: Records from various bodies, including SMS, Ministry of Diaspora, Armenian Development Agency (ADA), AGBU, major national universities

17.18

Proportion of SDG indicators produced at the national level with migration disaggregation.

 

Data source: National-level SDG data (as established by the SDG Council or other relevant body)

 

Conclusion

Throughout this project, the 2030 Agenda offered a conceptual framework for Armenia to identify key national migration and development issues, and to effectively monitor them. The prioritized targets reflect a range of issues, from labour rights to diaspora engagement and return migrant reintegration, showing the diversity of the SDGs’ migration and development scope. The project also succeeded in strengthening National Statistical Offices’ capacities to enhance migration data collection and management, with a view not only to monitor migration progress in the context of the 2030 Agenda, but also to improve national migration data in the long term. 

 

Photo credit: IOM Armenia 2016 (Photo: Matevosyan)

Ghana

Introduction

In February 2018 IOM launched the two-year project “Integrating Migration into National Development Plans: Towards Policy Coherence and the Achievement of Sustainable Development Goals at National and Global Levels”. This project was funded by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA) through the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Sub-Fund of the Peace and Development Fund, of which the People’s Republic of China is a major contributor. Implemented by IOM Ghana, the objective of the project is to support the Government of Ghana in mainstreaming migration into national development policies and achieving policy coherence, in line with the SDGs.

 

Methodology

  1. Establishment of a dedicated migration-SDG body: Setting up an inter-agency Technical Working Group (TWG) on migration.
  2. Capacity building activities on migration and the SDGs: Conducting capacity-building activities for the TWG.   
  3. Other activities TBD: Based on priorities identified by the TWG, two initiatives from the 2016 National Migration Policy (NMP) action plan will be selected and further developed.

 

Institutional Set Up

The first activity of the project involved establishing an institutional body to move forward activities relating to migration and the SDGs in Ghana. A dedicated inter-agency body was established in the form of a Technical Working Group on migration. Following this, terms of reference for the body were established, detailing its objectives, mandate, and various other functions and processes.

Integrating migration into national development plans: Towards policy coherence and achievement of the SDGs at national and global levels

 

Terms of Reference for Inter-Agency Technical Working Group

 

Background and Purpose

In September 2015, the UN General Assembly agreed on an ambitious, global sustainable development agenda for the next 15 years and adopted a new global development framework, namely the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The 2030 Agenda calls for action from governments and other stakeholders on 17 Sustainable Development Goals and 169 targets.  Unlike the Millennium Development Goals adopted more than a decade earlier, the new Agenda has explicitly incorporated migration as a global priority to develop a universal policy agenda. Migration policy is specifically mentioned in SDG target 10.7, which focuses on facilitating orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration through well-managed migration policies. In addition, the Agenda implicitly highlights the importance of safeguarding migrants’ rights and needs by securing equal access of all to education, decent work, livelihoods, social protection, and health. The need to develop a global framework for addressing migration and development was further stressed at the UN Summit for Refugees and Migrants held on 19 September 2016. This summit led to the adoption of the New York Declaration, which among its many commitments, aims to strengthen the global governance of migration and protect migrant rights.

To operationalize global commitments at the national level, governments and partners strive to achieve overall policy coherence and mainstreaming migration into national development plans and sectoral policies. With migration so prominently enshrined in the new development agenda, it becomes essential for the international community to support the efforts of countries to:

  1. Continue improving national migration strategies and policies to create the right conditions for migrants and migration to positively contribute to sustainable development;
  2. Ensure policy coherence and mainstream migration into other sectoral policies and national development plans;
  3. Pilot innovative approaches towards the practical implementation of coherent, development-oriented and SDG-aligned national policies.

This was in line with the priorities set in the 2030 Agenda’s SDGs, and to achieve the ambitious objective of mainstreaming migration into national development policies and ensure policy coherence. As part of the project implementation, an inter-agency technical working group is to be established to help track progress on the migration-related SDG indicators.

The objective of the project is to enable the Government of Ghana and its partners to mainstream migration into national development policies and achieve policy coherence in line with national SDG priorities.

This will be achieved through five main activities:

  1. Promote the formation of an inter-agency technical working group to track progress on migration-related SDG targets. The working group will identify priorities, map existing gaps and identify potential data sources.
  2. Develop country reports regarding the SDG objective on migration management, including relevant data.
  3. Conduct trainings to build the capacity of local stakeholders.
  4. Raise awareness of migration-related SDGs and targets.
  5. Test the action plan.

 

General Role of the inter-agency technical working group

The inter-agency technical working group will play the general role of assisting in implementation, monitoring and evaluating the project.

 

Specific functions: The inter-agency technical working group will:

  • provide guidance and direction to ensure the establishment of a national migration governance structure, which is the first step towards implementing the NMP;
  • exchange information to track progress on migration-related SDGs;
  • gather relevant information from institutions in support of project implementation;
  • provide guidance and support in addressing possible obstacles encountered throughout the course of the project;
  • oversee the progress of project implementation; and
  • assist in evaluating the project.

 

Composition of inter-agency technical working group: The group will be composed of an SDG focal person from each institution;

  1. Ministry of Interior
  2. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration
  3. Ministry for Employment and Labour Relations
  4. Ministry for Gender, Children and Social Protection
  5. Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development
  6. Ministry of Planning
  7. Ministry of Health
  8. Ministry of Education
  9. Ministry of Finance
  10. The Bank of Ghana
  11. Centre for Migration Studies
  12. Ghana Immigration Service
  13. Ghana Police Service
  14. National Development Planning Commission
  15. Ghana Statistical Services
  16. Office of Diaspora Relations – Office of the President
  17. Civil Society Platform for the Implementation

 

Responsibilities of the inter-agency technical working group, IOM Accra:

  • Provide a draft agenda for each meeting and share it with members to get their input.
  • Facilitate each meeting, adhering to the agreed agenda.
  • Ensure close adherence of the work of the inter-agency technical working group to the agreed annual work plan and use each meeting to review action points agreed at the last meeting.
  • Update on progress against the annual work plan to the Project Steering Committee.

 

Responsibilities of members:

  • Attend monthly meetings. Only in exceptional cases could representatives be designated in case of absence.
  • Contribute to discussions and decisions for project implementation.
  • Provide regular reports to their respective ministries, department, agencies, institutions and organizations.
  • Communicate issues that may be affecting project implementation to the inter-agency technical working group and project team.

 

Financial requirement and logistical support

Administrative and logistical support for organizing the inter-agency working group meetings will be borne by IOM. Members of the inter-agency technical working group will be entitled to a transport allowance at the end of each meeting.

 

Capacity Building

A capacity building workshop was held on migration and development in the context of the SDGs. Over two days, a series of presentations and group exercises took place on thematic topics as well as operational guidance. This introduced concepts of migration and development, and allowed for discussion on the linkages between migration and certain sectors, such as health, education, employment, labour rights and agriculture. Participants then discussed these linkages in the context of Ghana. The workshop also provided participants with practical advice on how to integrate migration considerations into their respective sectors, with a view to contributing to sustainable development under the 2030 Agenda. The workshop also included the involvement of national stakeholders. One session on how to conduct public and practitioner awareness raising activities on migration in the SDGs was co-facilitated by a representative from the United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) in Ghana.

 

Feedback from Participants

“These kinds of workshops are very useful because they bring out good ideas and constructive approaches at working.  Mainstreaming migration into national development plans are also very brilliant ways of tackling our development challenges.  However, we will require logistics support from the various sectors to be able to put in practice whatever we discuss. It is obvious that no one single sector can handle the issues of migration alone. We must join efforts and resources to be able to attain the desired results.”

Ms. Victoria Natsu, Acting Executive Secretary, Human Trafficking Secretariat, Ministry of Gender, Children and Social Protection

“I have learnt from the workshop how migration dynamics will help me to better position education resources.  Migration is not bad.  It can either develop or derail our objective settings.  As an expert in the field of education, I can now better understand how and why we need to understand migration and development.”

Mr. Ernest Wesley-Otoo, Development Partners Coordinator, Ministry of Education

 

“Hitherto, some of us have not read much about the issue of migration and development. I have learnt a lot from the workshop and as such my operations would be carried out with this topic in mind .... Understanding data in the areas of migration and child trafficking, for instance, can inform our approach towards finding solution to crime in the country.  I also find it necessary to share knowledge and information on migration and the SDGs with my colleagues.”

DSP Al-meyao Abass, Commanding Officer, National Rapid Deployment Force, Police Headquarters, Operations

“What this workshop made clear is the need for the inclusion of data disaggregated by migration within its [National Development Planning Commission (NDPC)] results matrix. For me, the TWG is necessary because it keeps us focused on migration.  What we need to do, however, is to set key priorities and work towards achieving them.”

Lila-Karen Amponsah, Planning Analysts, National Development Planning Commission

 

 

Conclusion

Through the establishment of the inter-agency TWG, the project enabled a diverse range of government stakeholders to engage with each other on national migration and development issues for the first time. The fact that the TWG includes representatives from so many different ministries increases the chances of strong horizontal policy coherence between sectors once specific interventions are designed and implemented under the auspices of the TWG. Through the capacity building workshop, relevant stakeholders were sensitized on different migration and development topics and were able to examine these topics in the context of Ghana, preparing them also to design comprehensive, tailored interventions relating to migration and the SDGs. As of July 2018, the project is still ongoing and will develop and implement further activities.

 

Photo credit: Cynthia Prah, United Nations Information Centre (UNIC) Accra

Ecuador

Introduction

In Ecuador in 2014, the Decentralised Autonomous Government of the Province of Imbabura (GADPI) and its provincial government (Patronato Provincial) embarked on a process to mainstream migration into local development planning. The government wished to address the complex migration dynamics of the region, which included a large presence of Colombian refugees, many immigrants, as well as returning migrants. To address this, the government chose to mainstream migration into local development planning in order to design and implement effective policies and programmes that would protect the rights of migrants and displaced persons and ensure their access to services, as well as provide them with more opportunities and empowerment. The project started before the adoption of the 2030 Agenda and, thus, was not conducted under an SDG-related framework. However, the outputs of its migration interventions contribute to several Goals and targets, and have since been mapped to various SDGs. The process was carried out with the support of the UN Joint Migration and Development Initiative (JMDI) within the framework of the project “Strengthening the Decentralised Autonomous Governments (GADs) of the Northern Zone of Ecuador on Human Mobility Issues”.

 

Methodology

  1. Participatory kick-off activities: Kicking off by carrying out various participatory processes to take stock of migration and development priorities in the area.
  2. Institutional set up: Establishing appropriate bodies and several inter-institutional coordination mechanisms to manage the mainstreaming process.
  3. Migration mainstreaming: Designing and implementing various policies and programmes relating to migration and development in the region, through mainstreaming migration into different government units’ planning.

 

Consultations

To conduct a needs assessment to determine the exact requirements of the mainstreaming process, a participatory process of direct public consultation was launched. This entailed holding several public assemblies. At these assemblies, people from the Imbabura Province were gathered to share their specific needs and issues. Care was taken to include certain priority attention groups, such as children, young people, the elderly and migrants and displaced persons.

 

Institutional Set Up

In 2015, the Human Mobility Unit (HMU) was created. This saw the inclusion of a dedicated technical team in the provincial government’s payroll, charged with supporting and complimenting work of the various units in government regarding the migration mainstreaming process, and promoting inter-institutional coordination. Following this, the provincial government developed the “Ordinance for the Promotion and Protection of the Rights of Migrants, Displaced Persons, and their Family Members in the Province of Imbabura”, which declared the promotion and protection of the rights of migrants and displaced persons as public policy, and established the HMU as the agency responsible for coordination and implementation.

The provincial government mapped out various public and private actors working with migrants in the province. Following this, it was possible to coordinate with other national actors – such as the Ministries of Public Health, Economic and Social Inclusion, Education, and Foreign Affairs and Human Mobility – to move various interventions forward to protect and uphold the rights of migrants.

 

Interventions: Mainstreaming Migration

Numerous government units across sectors mainstreamed migration into their planning in different ways. The other units within the provincial government, including Food Sovereignty, Health Services, and Domestic Violence and Disability, started including migrants and displaced persons as their beneficiaries. To do so, these units integrated new targets into their programming that related to migrants and their needs. Other examples of activities launched included those aiming to create economic opportunities for migrants. These included entrepreneurship fairs, training in crafts, and support for the management of migrant micro-enterprises.

Finally, the provincial government also promoted direct participation as a way to ensure the political inclusion of migrants and displaced persons. In this regard, migrants and displaced persons were encouraged to actively participate in political decision-making spaces.

 

Conclusion

The project as a whole succeeded in mainstreaming migration into public policies across sectors in Imbabura. While migration mainstreaming processes tend to take place at the national level, it is at the local level where these can have the most impact. This example shows how doing so can help serve specific needs of migrant populations, as well as involve them directly in the process. The mainstreaming process in Imbabura helped make progress towards several SDG targets. For example, target 10.3 (ensuring equal opportunity and reduce inequalities of outcome), 10.7 (facilitating orderly, safe, regular and responsible migration and mobility of people), 16.B (promoting non-discriminatory laws and policies for sustainable development), 17.4 (enhancing policy coherence for sustainable development), and 17.16 (enhancing the global partnership for sustainable development).

Ethiopia

Introduction

Under the same “Integrating Migration into National Development Plans: Towards Policy Coherence and the Achievement of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at National and Global Levels” project as Ghana, a process kicked off in Ethiopia to mainstream migration into national development policies in 2018. The objective was for government partners to strengthen their capacities in implementing coherent migration and development policies in Ethiopia, in the context of the 2030 Agenda.

 

Methodology

  1. Awareness raising and capacity building on migration and the SDGs: Holding sessions to raise awareness of migration in the SDGs and build the capacity of government stakeholders to take action.
  2. Establishment of a dedicated migration-SDG body: Establishing an inter-agency body to manage the migration-SDG process.
  3. Activities to be decided: Based on migration and development priorities identified by the body above, a number of interventions will be developed and implemented.

 

Awareness Raising and Capacity Building

As a first step in the project, a joint awareness raising and capacity building training was organized in February 2018. This was aimed at government stakeholders from different ministries and was carried out in close collaboration with the National Anti-Trafficking and Smuggling Taskforce Secretariat under the Attorney General’s Office. Ministries represented included the Central Statistical Agency (CSA), Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs (MoLSA), Ministry of Federal Urban Job Creation Opportunity and Food Security, and others.

The objectives of the training were to introduce stakeholders to migration in the SDGs, sensitize them on the concept of migration mainstreaming, and build their capacity to design concrete ways to mainstream migration. The training was also carried out to help determine the nature and composition of the working group to lead the rest of the migration-SDG process.

Participants were introduced to the different entry points of migration in the SDGs, including where targets explicitly included migration, as well as where migration was a cross-cutting theme in Goals. Participants explored linkages between migration and different sectors, and discussed them in the context of migration and development issues in Ethiopia. The training walked participants through several methods to mainstream migration into national development planning. Following this, participants brainstormed how to design migration interventions relating to selected SDG targets in their particular sectors. To do this, they first identified relevant existing laws, policies and frameworks, and based on these frameworks discussed possible interventions. 

 

Institutional set up

An existing inter-ministerial National Anti-Trafficking and Smuggling task force secretariat helped lead the initial steps of the project, given its involvement in migration-related issues in Ethiopia. However, the next step after holding the training is to formally establish an institutional set up to lead the rest of the migration-SDG process forward.

To establish the leadership and coordination structure of the future process, consultations were conducted with different ministries. The aim was, as far as possible, to build on existing migration governance structures and coordination mechanisms instead of establishing new ones. Discussions have focused on how to adapt the Anti-Trafficking and Smuggling task force and expand its scope so it can lead the SDG-migration process. For example, the task force secretariat could lead and coordinate the process in conjunction with one ministry. As of July 2018, the process to establish the way forward is ongoing.

Once the institutional set up is decided, several activities will be undertaken, including developing a country report regarding migration-SDG objectives, suggesting and carrying out mainstreaming steps, and helping track progress on migration-related SDG targets.

 

Conclusion

The project succeeded in raising awareness of concepts and practices around migration in the SDGs, and building capacity for national stakeholders to take them forward. Further, because activities to date have included different ministries, chances of achieving policy coherence in migration have been significantly boosted. Under the framework of the project, once the institutional set up is finalized, a number of mainstreaming initiatives will be implemented.

 

Taking action

  • Prendre des mesures
  • Lancement
  • Etablissement des priorites
  • Mise en oeuvre
  • Suivi et elaboration de rapports