White Paper: Mainstreaming Migration into Local Development Planning and Beyond

Related Sustainable Development Goals and Global Compact for Migration Objectives

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SDG 4: Quality Education
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SDG 11: Sustainable Cities and Communities
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SDG 15: Life on Land
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SDG 16: Peace, Justice and Strong Institutions
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The Joint Migration and Development Initiative (JMDI) and International Organization for Migration (IOM) have joined forces and expertise to carry out a study titled “Mainstreaming Migration into Local Development Planning and Beyond,” which aims to provide a thorough analysis of what has been done thus far in mainstreaming migration at the local level, and allows for a stocktaking of functioning practices to paint a global picture of working processes, lessons learned and policy recommendations for future mainstreaming exercises. The importance of local authorities in developing and implementing migration and development policies and initiatives, as well as driving integration processes, is increasingly recognized at the global level. At the same time, the process of integrating migration within policy design and planning – also known as the “mainstreaming” process – is increasingly perceived as key to addressing migration-related issues, as well as in building on all the opportunities associated with it. This process is based on the recognition of the wide range of policy areas that affect and are affected by migration, and on the subsequent building of coherence among concerned policies and actors. Although mainstreaming processes are now mainly addressed at the national level, its translation and application at the local level is increasingly considered a crucial aspect in maximizing the potential of migration for development. Indeed, several territories around the globe have initiated such coherence-building processes in the recent years, and therefore their experiences constitute a precious knowledge-base of good practices and lessons learned.